Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Fundraising!

Taco was adopted from our local Humane Society so I decided we would participate in their annual fundraising event this spring.  In the past, it was called the Mutt Strutt but our community is getting fairly well known for our spring marathon so this year it was called the IL Muttathon.  It's basically a  group dog walk followed by activities like paw painting and agility obstacles and contests like the Peanut Butter Licking Contest.  Cute! 
Taco, are you all tuckered out from fundraising?
Taco and I set our fundraising goal at $200 and we made it!  I sold dog toys and treats.  And I participated in a research project at the University.  (That's kind of my go-to  for making extra pocket money, I am an excellent human research subject!)
Taco showing off his plastic bag boot.  He cut his foot (again!) and has to be booted up for a while.
But due to the dog flu, they have postponed it.  Bummer!  And even bigger bummer, the new date is the same date as an obedience trial I've already entered Taco and Dot in.  :(  But I'm happy we set our goal and made it and will be helping out the Humane Society. 
Taco shows our house guest, Cali,where the best sunbathing opportunities are.

Thursday, April 23, 2015

2015 4-H Kick-Off

4-H Dog Training Classes have started and are busily teaching the beginners what dog training is all about and preparing the more advanced students to take their training to the next level!  The K-9 Crusaders is the name of our club and I was a member of this exact club when I was in 4-H.  Nowadays, it's what's known as a SPIN (Special Interest) Club as we focus on only one project, dogs.  In our county, there are also SPIN Clubs for baking, shooting sports, robotics, sewing, etc.  It's a great way for kids interested in a particular project to get info and hands-on instruction.

The thing I love about teaching is seeing the moment someone gets excited and genuinely clicks with a concept.  This year we have a continuing student from last year who did not want to move up to the advanced class.  I think she was comfortable being one of the "better beginners" and wasn't excited about the prospect of not being at the head of the class.  We also use mostly positive reinforcement and motivational techniques in our advanced class and she is most comfortable with more traditional chain collar corrections.  The moment I saw her correctly applying the Fenzi pocket hand to her dog, and loving the result, my heart sang!
A fellow leader teaches the Showmanship class.
Kids and animals are an awesome mix most of the time but it also has it's challenges.  In my ten years of volunteering with the club, we've had some trying times.  I don't want to gloss over these as I hope we have used them as learning experiences.  This year we had a fairly serious dog bite incident where a beginner's dog bit (and kept going for and biting) a Junior Leader who was helping the class.  I felt terrible, so upset that it had happened to a young person who was only trying to help and did nothing to provoke the attack.  I felt bad for the young handler who was upset that it happened and scared what would happen to her dog.  I felt angry at the parents, who had decided this dog was safe to bring to a class of children despite finding out later that it had a bite history with family and friends.  But animals are animals and things will happen.  We got through it, hopefully preserving the young handler's interest in dogs and training for the future.  And we learned from it, hopefully improving our process for registration, screening and intervention in years to come.

My lesson plans this year stress NOT drilling your dog, NOT rehearsing and rehashing the same old trial prep.  Training sessions should not look like the same boring string of exercises you are required to do in the competition ring.  For the most part, the class is willing to try my silly activities but I wonder what their training looks like at home.  I hope if I give them enough options, they'll find a few that they enjoy enough to do on their own.  Any suggestions?  So far we've worked in hand touches, leg weaves/recalls through the handler's legs, games/toys to end heeling without a formal halt, Janice Gunn's cookie toss games for fronts without a formal recall, and we do Shirley Chong's clicker retrieve method.

Friday, April 10, 2015

No Therapy For Us


After a few more Therapy Dog visits with Dot, it became apparent that therapy work just isn't Dot's calling.  She is a friendly dog, outgoing and willing to go and be anywhere.  She greets people.  She knows a command for go say hi and a command for resting her head on their lap.  But if were up to her, she'd spend about 10 seconds with each person and then move on!  She just wants to move, see what's next, get to the next room, smell the next hallway, see who is around the next corner.  She doesn't want to linger and let someone pet her for ages and ages.  She kind of wants to move on, which I can only imagine makes the person being visited feel left out and longing for more interaction, not exactly the feelings aTherapy Dog should bring out in people. 

When visiting nursing home patients or students stressed about finals, she is not the patient, ever-present calming force with others that she is with me.  With my husband and I, she is insistent and merciless in her quest for attention and petting.  She is the dog that nudges and rubs and forces your hand onto her.  And I thought sure she'd be that way with others, but not so.

After I had already made the decision and contacted our local therapy contact who had been supervising our visits, a friend posted a link to this blogpost.   It is so true, people want to be out with their animals, sharing them and doing good but it really is a small percentage of all dogs that actually enjoy and crave that type of activity.  While I wouldn't say the Dot didn't enjoy it at ALL, there were certainly other things she'd rather be doing if given the chance.
These two photos are examples of Dot would rather be!